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Types of Restorative Justice Programs

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1. Community Justice Forums

"What are you sorry for?"

Based in Indigenous thinking with roots in the Maori peoples.  In conferencing, a trained facilitator is always present.  Participation is voluntary for everyone.  To participate, the offender must first admit to the offence.  At the conference, the victim and their supporters can describe the impact of the offence and ask the offender questions.  Together, the group discusses how the harm can be repaired. in Indigenous culture and guided by a trained facilitator, the peacemaking circle can include whole families or just a few individual from both sides of an event.  They bring the participants together to agree on guidelines, discuss the events and the parties determine the outcome.   

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2. Victim Offender Conferencing 

"What do you need to do to make things right?"


In this format the victim and the offender talk to each other.  A trained mediator facilitates.  The goal is for the parties to agree on how justice should be fulfilled.

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3. Peacemaking Circles

Based in Indigenous culture and guided by a trained facilitator, the peacemaking circle can include whole families or just a few individual from both sides of an event.  They bring the participants together to agree on guidelines, discuss the events and the parties determine the outcome.

4. RJ Dialogues & Conferences

RJ Dialogues and Conferences are a key component of restorative justice practices, fostering open and inclusive discussions among stakeholders affected by harm or conflict. These dialogues and conferences provide a platform for victims, offenders, and community members to share their perspectives, experiences, and emotions, promoting empathy and understanding. Through this process, participants collectively explore solutions, repair harm, and work towards reconciliation and healing in a restorative and empowering way.

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